Study finds that exercise ‘keeps the mind sharp’ for over 50s

Study finds that exercise ‘keeps the mind sharp’ for over 50sDoing exercise at any age is worthwhile for the brain. Australian research shows that taking up the exercise for at least 45 minutes several times a week helps in keeping our mind sharp if you’re over 50s. Thinking capacity and memory skills get enhanced when people exercise their body regularly. Exercises such as T’ai Chi combines aerobics and weight training were suggested to those people who were not able to do other forms of exercise.

Physical activity helps us to get rid-off variety of disease including type-2 diabetes and some typical kinds of cancer. It also helps in prevention of dementia in older people. Now the question arises how exercise helps in keeping the mind sharp. The philosophy behind this is that after doing exercise brain receives a greater supply of blood, oxygen and nutrients that help in improvement of health as well as growth hormone responsible for formation of new neurons and connections and improves attention.

A study was conducted by the researchers from the University of Canberra where they observed the effects of physical exercise on the brains of adults. After carrying out a variety of tests they found that aerobic exercise proved best and enhanced thinking, reading, learning and cognitive capabilities while muscle training or resistance training like lifting weights increase brain’s ability to plan and organize.

Joe Northey, study author and researcher at the Research Institute for Sport and Exercise at Canberra said, “Even if you do moderate exercise only once or twice a week you will still see improvements in cognitive function, but the improvements were better the more exercise was done.” He further added: People should be able to hold the conversation while doing moderate exercise.

In addition, with doing exercise it is equally important to stay mentally active, take a balanced diet, drink sufficient amount of water and avoid smoking, says Dr. David Reynolds, from Alzheimer’s Research UK.