This new Micro Motor can Inject Antibiotics in Humans, the Recent Study Reveals

Listening to the word micro motor we feel it’s something that has to do with the mechanical structure. But, it’s not always the way we think. A team of researchers came together to form a biological structure called as a micro motor in order to make the injection of antibodies into the human bodies easier.

The structure of micro motor:

Micromotor is a small tiny structure made up of titanium oxide, magnesium and a synthetic material having its origin from chitosan, an arthropod. They are spherical in shape. Until they bang the walls of the stomach, they remain in an inactive state. Due to the acidic nature of stomach, the flips of the motor come out.

The central part of the drug consists of the bulb of magnesium enclosed by titanium oxide. The drug is placed on the top of the device and eventually, chitosan plays its role in gelling together the entire structure. Magnesium present at the center triggers the motor to work forcefully by shedding of a vapor of hydrogen bubbles.
This is the reason why most of the antibiotics in humans do not retain their original existence when they enter the stomach. The main responsibility of the drug is to protect the drug from getting vanished and allow it to drive all over the body.

To find the reality of this motor, researchers carried out an experiment on Helicobacter pylori bacteria using mice as a carrier. This bacterium is responsible to produce sores in the stomach. Previously, primary care physicians prescribed an antibiotic along a secondary drug to lower down the effect of the ulcer. But those drugs lead to an undesirable effect.

An additional advantage of this micro motor is that it does not entail any assistance of secondary drug. The micromotor soothes down the effect of ulcer and simultaneously decomposes the magnesium that in turn reduces the formation of hydrogen bubbles. The test conducted revealed that functioning of a micro motor was much effective than other traditional methods.