Fatal Malaria in the U.S. More Common Than Previously Known

Fatal Malaria in the U.S. More Common Than Previously KnownAccording to a new study, serious and deadly attacks of malaria in the US has raised again. Diana Khuu, the lead author and an epidemiologist at the Fielding School of Public Health at the University of California, Los Angeles said, “These malaria mosquitoes typically bite people having age between 20 to 50 years belonging from Africa or the Caribbean.”

Most of the women were hospitalized and 14 percent of them were pregnant. Malaria could prove fatal to both mother and fetus as their immune system lowers down.  The deaths due to malaria were dropped by 60 percent since 2000, the disease has killed about 429,000 people every year. Most of them are young children under the age of 5 from Africa.

The author conducted a study in which they examined 100 million records of the patients discharged from the hospital from the year 2000 to 2014 in the National Inpatient Sample of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. They found 22,000 patients were hospitalized for malaria. The count was 5 times as many as were hospitalized. 5,000 of them were diagnosed with kidney failure or coma and 182 of them died.

Every year there are around 1,500 to 2,000 cases of malaria in the United States but the study conducted estimated that there are 2,100 cases. Coming to the races, among the hospitalized patients more than half were black; 60 percent were male having age between 25 to 44, the study found. Whites stood second highest and Asians the third. Countries from where malaria originated were not recorded, but C.D.C. records suggest that many travelers to India get malaria while on family visits, Dr. Khuu said. Cases peaked in August and again in January, suggesting that they were linked to summer and Christmas visits, he further added in his statement.